NATURAL HEATING SYSTEMS

 Hydronic heating systems & masonry space heaters       BACK 

                                  

SUSTAINABLE BUILDING RESOURCES  PTY LTD

 

Po Box 35

Macclesfield 5153

South Australia

Phone: ++ 61(0) 8 83889033

Fax:     ++61(0) 8 83889048

 

E-mail: sbresources@internode.on.net

 

A well designed house uses passive solar energy to heat up thermal mass during sunshine hours. This energy is stored  and slowly released during the night as radiant energy.

Mankind has long harvested this comfortable and healthy form of heating through passive solar designs.

In many countries  passive solar energy was not available all year round.  There heating systems where developed reproducing the feel of a sun warmed rock on a cool evening in the house. Most of these heaters where wood/coal fired masonry heaters. The best known but least effective of these is the open fireplace. A very effective form traditional in central Europe and Scandinavia  is closed, often lined with ceramic tiles and available in an endless array of forms and functions.

This form of heater could be an oven, have a cook top attached, have a warm bench to sit on, a bed, heat your water as well as your whole house.    

Modern studies have shown, that the most comfortable and healthiest

form of heating  uses low temperature radiant heat as the sun heated wall/floor in a passive solar house provides.

 

Many common heating methods today are wasting energy, produce unnecessary pollution and are detrimental to our health.

 

We recommend & design low temperature radiant heat systems.

Hydronic heating systems or masonry space heaters (Kachelofen, wood, gas or hot water or hot air heated) or a combination of these can provide this healthy warmth.

We encourage to use solar hot water to run the Hydronic system or solar hot air to heat hollow masonry structures or walls from the inside to achieve low temperature radiant heat.   

                                                                    

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